Trayvon Martin

The Trayvon Martin case is an absolute tragedy. I can’t imagine having a child walking home from a gas station with skittles and iced tea and being murdered because he “looked suspicious.” This is just a horrendous, heart-wrenching situation.

It also sheds light on the ongoing debates concerning race and justice in this country. I’ve followed the case with interest over the last few days and highly recommend the following four articles. Each is approaching the situation from a different perspective, though all are in sympathy with the same conclusion.

Walking While Black by Frances Cudjoe Waters

  • Heart-wrenching reflections on the case by an African-American mother. Shai Linne says, ”This excellent article reflects how many African-Americans feel, myself included.”

Trayvon Martin, Race, and the Gospel by John Piper

  • Helpful thoughts on how Christians can think Scriptural thoughts about this case.

White’s Should Be Suspicious About Trayvon Martin’s Death by Bob Bixby

  • Well-worth the read. Bob Bixby is thoughtful and an excellent writer. Good thoughts here on racial profiling.

The Curious Case of Trayvon Martin by Charles Blow

Excellent NYT op-ed piece. It was recommended by Stephanie Garcia, who is from our church and along with her husband Pedro, has adopted three black boys. She says the following: “I have been following this case the last few days, but have hesitated to recommend an article until now. This well-written piece includes these words which weigh heavy on my heart: ‘That is the burden of black boys in America and the people that love them: running the risk of being descended upon in the dark and caught in the cross-hairs of someone who crosses the line’.”

5 thoughts on “Trayvon Martin

  1. Marshall

    David.
    Thought provoking for sure. I think it is good for us all to remember that we were not there and need to be careful about pretending like we know what happened. I think you strike a good balance here. For all the people that I’ve heard jump on Zimmerman and decide in their minds that they know exactly what he was thinking (that it was racial in some way)–this borders on being prejudiced.
    Now, we’re finding out that one witness (identity not yet revealed) says Trayvon Martin was the aggressor and was beating up Zimmerman. (http://www.myfoxtampabay.com/dpp/news/state/witness-martin-attacked-zimmerman-03232012)
    Of course, we don’t know what happened. Perhaps we will soon. I don’t know if this was Hispanic (or “white” — but he looks Hispanic to me) on Black racism or not — and I think it’s good to reserve judgment until we know the whole story.

    Reply
  2. admin Post author

    Marshall, thanks for the interaction. I saw this report earlier today and while it certainly helps shed light on what happened, it seems to border on disrespectful to the entire situation to make the unarmed 17 year old the “aggressor” against the armed man pursuing him. Perhaps he defended himself before he was shot. But the burden of this whole thing has to lie against Zimmerman. He’s the one who pursued him even after he was told the police were coming, and ultimately he’s the one who shot and killed a teenager. Being knocked down by a guy you approach with a gun, still isn’t a good excuse to shoot him.

    Your point about not knowing whether Zimmerman’s motivations were racial are, of course, correct.

    Reply
    1. Marshall

      I agree. I don’t want to make light of this at all. It is a true injustice. However, It seems that if you even question the perception that this was some white guy shooting a defenseless black kid (which is what, it appears, happened) out of racial hatred, then you must be siding with Zimmerman. I’m not siding with Zimmerman (you know that). I just wish everyone would approach these kind of situations delicately and carefully — that will never happen. When the facts all come out I will feel more comfortable making a judgment.

      Reply
  3. Rose

    I, too, believe this to be a great tragedy. But, I agree with Marshall in that we can’t be quick to judge either side. My one question that I haven’t seen answered is why Trayvon was walking in a gated community. Did he live in that community? If not, and he was not a familiar face then the fact that he was there and wearing a hooded sweatshirt would have roused suspicion by a neighborhood watch group. The purpose of gated communities is to keep out riffraff. However, shooting an unharmed child is senseless. We don’t know what words might have been exchanged and, unfortunately, boys at this age try to act much tougher than they really are. My heart and prayers go out to the families involved.

    Reply
  4. Pastor Mike Harding

    Dave,

    There is a special prosecutor investigating this case. After the investigation is finished, I surmise that Mr. Zimmerman will be arrested on either second-degree murder or man-slaughter charges. My heart goes out to the parents of Trevon Martin. I think they have handled themselves in an honorable fashion in light of the horrific tragedy of losing their son. I don’t know all the salient facts; therefore, it would be prejudicial and premature for me to declare someone a murderer. I do know that Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and the Black Panthers have used this case for a race-baiting agenda. The Black Panthers have publicly commited a crime by offering a large bounty for Mr. Zimmerman “dead or alive”. That is a crime—murder for hire. I do know that ABC and NBC news have purposely doctored video tape at the police station and the audio tape of the 911 call regarding Zimmerman in order to make it appear that Zimmerman was involved in racial profiling and that he had not received a serious injury on the back of his head. This is intentionally bearing false witness to millions of people causing an already enraged community to become even more flummoxed. The result is that several NYTimes writers have already declared in print that Zimmerman is a “cold-blooded murderer”. I think that statement put in print at this time is immoral. If it is proven that Zimmerman murdered Martin, I would advocate the death penalty for him. Meanwhile, I grieve over the numerous black babies, black children, and black women who have been savagely murdered in Detroit just within the last few months by random black-on-black crime which accounts for the murder of blacks by blacks at a statistical 9 to 1 ratio when compared to other ethnic groups. This highly selected outrage by some media leaders seems quite disingenuous.

    Reply

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